Cabin Creek, Colorado – Ghost Town For Sale

Cabin Creek, Colorado is the quintessential small town abandoned along side a highway. Located 57 miles almost due east of Denver Colorado, history about this town is frustratingly hard to find. It isn’t even listed on most other ghost towns sites. News of this town is hitting the national level though because it made headlines as being “for sale,” in July 2016 for the price of $350,000.

The town is a collection of buildings on a five acre lot. They include a gas station, garage, 8 room hotel, restaurant, two homes, 8 RV hook ups, and a communal well. The town appears to have only had three owners. The current owner wanted to make it into a tourist town, but it looks like he never quite had the money to really do it right. The hotel is gutted, the gas station inoperable, and the RV park’s infrastructure ruined beyond use, but the houses are apparently livable and the garage is good.

Cabin Creek, Colorado

Cabin Creek, Colorado from Google Street View

The towns “ghost” status is attributed to murders that happened here. Most sources say that they murders happened in the 1970s, and the ghosts of the murdered are still around. But, the only murders that can I can positively identify as happening here were in 1987.

Two men, John ‘Doc’ Whitus Jr. and Steven Miller were already serving time for separate double murders in the California Medical Facility, a state prison in Vacaville, California. They broke out in 1986 and somehow found their way to Cabin Creek where they worked for Grace Kuamoo and Russell Schwartzmiller at the town. The couple were described as survivalists who had an large gun collection and up to $64,000 in cash on hand.

The two men murdered the couple, stole their guns, the cash, and a white van and headed to Montana. They were tracked in wilderness about 30 miles north of Helena and had several gun battles over a week long period with police. One of the men was wounded, but the seriousness of the injury isn’t known. They were eventually trapped in a trailer home, where the two murders were randomly shooting through the walls at police. One of them hit a small propane tank, and then another bullet hit the panel for an electric furnace. The resulting explosion burned the trailer down with both men inside.

It is unclear how many people lived in the town when the murders happened, but the stories agree that the town emptied pretty quickly afterwards. James Johnson purchased the property sometime in the 1990s and spent several years getting it livable again. He sold the property to a non-profit who allowed people to live there. One stripped the buildings of wire and removed the electrical hook ups for the RVs. He regained control of the property in 2012 after the non-profit had it for six years. Since then he has been working hard to restore it, but there is still a lot of work to go.

You can see more of Cabin Creek, Colorado on it’s official Facebook page, or online.

Kuldhara — A Cursed Village Near Jaisalmer

Kuldhara is a tourist ghost town located in eastern Rajasthan, India 18 kilometers south east of Jaislmer. It does not have an official website, but there are a number of caretakers there who charge a nominal entrance fee of 50 Rupees. The money collected goes to preserve the town. A number of buildings have been restored and provide welcoming relief from the sun.

History

Kuldhara was established in 1291 after the Paliwal clan migrated from Pali to escape the tyranny of the Pali king. and became the largest of 85 towns in the area. It had a population of about 1500 people, all of whom were Paliwal Brahmins, decedents of the Maharaj Haridas. The towns flourished and became an active trade center.

But for some reason all 85 villages were abandoned in the mid 1800s. The exact date of the exodus is in question too, some sites say as much as 300 years ago, but most say 150-170 years.

The population is said to have been very intelligent, knowing the secrets of cultivating water intensive crops in the desert. They knew the “secret” of identifying the layers of rock and which ones could keep water in the desert. It is also said that every time someone joined one of the villages, each family in the village would give that person a brick to start a house, and a gold coin to start a business.

The Stories

The stories about the town do not stop there. Some feel that the towns were abandoned due to invasion by the Mughal Empire. Another says that the minister of the time demanded heavy taxes and inhumanely treated the Paliwal Brahmins peoples.

Closeup on Architectural work

Photo by Lucia Sanchez

But the prevailing story, and the one told by the caretakers, is that an unmanned minister had his eye on the daughter of the chief of Kuldhara. He demanded to marry her and threatened the locals if he did not. They villages got together and decided to leave totally, leaving no trace behind. Before they left, they cursed the villages so that nobody could inhabit the village again. It is believe that the unnamed minister might have been Diwan Salim Singh, and the exodus took place between 1825 and 1830.

This story is the reason why many feel the town is haunted now. There are reports of weird feelings, and ghostly chills, and even an investigation by ghost hunters. It is also said that the Paliwal Brahmins do not celebrate Rakshabandhan as this was the day they abandoned the city.

Today

No matter the validity of the stories of Kuldhara’s demise, what remains today is decidedly a ghost town. The entire area is littered with abandoned buildings from the 85 towns. Kuldhara itself has a well, and the remains of a temple that are both preserved.

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Kuldhara Village in Jaisalmer - Endless, Ruined, Vacant Villagehttp://blog.chaukhat.com/2010/02/kuldhara-cursed-village-near-jaisalmer.html

Kuldhara Village in Jaisalmer – Endless, Ruined, Vacant Villagehttp://blog.chaukhat.com/2010/02/kuldhara-cursed-village-near-jaisalmer.html

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Photos by Chandra

Closeup on Architectural work

Photo by Lucia Sanchez

Kuldhara

href=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/gofootloose/”>Photo by Tomas Belcik

Western Ghost town of Hornitos

The Ghirardelli & Co. Ruins

Western Ghost town of Hornitos

The rowdy western ghost town of Hornitos California once had up to 15,000 people in the 1880s. It now sits at a population of 75 as of 2010.

The town has several major claims to fame:

Joaquin Murieta Wanted Poster

– One of the rowdiest towns in the Mariposa Mining District. Citizens from nearby Quartzburg expelled the undesirable elements, who simply moved up the creek to build a new, more prosperous town. It had a big reputation for lawlessness that lead to figures like well known Mexican Bandit, Joaquin Murrieta.

Western Ghost town of Hornitos - The Ghirardelli & Co. Ruins

The Ghirardelli & Co. Ruins in Hornitos California by Wayne Hsieh

Domenico Ghirardelli had a general store to supply the miners here from 1856 to 1859. He sold chocolates here and perfected his recipes before moving to San Francisco and entering the chocolate business full time. The ruins of this building can still be seen.

– The FreeMason Lodge is claimed to be the physically smallest in California, and possibly the United States. It is still active after 160 years.

Hornitos Freemason Lodge No 98

Hornitos Freemason Lodge No 98

In addition, Hornitos is “known” to be haunted. Dozens of stories abound about various ghosts in the town. Most of them murdered or otherwise bad deaths.

Ghost Towns of Ontario

Ghost Towns of Ontario

Ghost Towns of Ontario

Ghost Towns of Ontario

Ontario Provincial Parliament Building by TMAB2003

Ontario Canada has an astounding number of Ghost Towns. Some count over 200 locations! In the 1800s the government spurred development of the providence by creating a number of Colonization Roads. These were roads that penetrated deep into the wilderness and were meant to allow people to claim their 100 acres of land. Many of these roads wandered along rivers and connected existing trails and roads to create rudimentary transportation network across the providence.

Unfortunately many of these towns never grew very large. Farming was found to be pretty hard. Land would give out within a few short decades and become barren. Many people in these towns turned to timber or mining, some turned to servicing travelers along the roads. This just prolonged the inevitable fate of these towns.

There was also a large amount of mineral exploration in the eastern part of the providence. As we have seen in other places, former boom towns become ghost towns really quickly when the mines run out, or become unprofitable.

The Towns

Esmonde Ontario

Esmonde Ontario

Esmonde Ontario was a small settlement that sprang up along the Opeongo Colonization Road along the Ottawa River in to the Madawaska Highlands in the mid 1800s. Like many towns along the Colonization Roads, it was meant to be a farm town. Unfortunately the land proved to be unsuitable to farming and played out quickly, so settlers turned to timber.

At it’s height Esmonde had a population of 25 people. But they built a saw and shingle mill, a school and both and Anglican Church and an Roman Catholic Church. When the Ottawa, Arnprior and Parry Sound Railway (which became the Canada Atlantic Railway,) opened in 1893 traffic along the Opeongo Colonization Road disappeared totally. This finally killed the town completely.

Today, the Roman Catholic Church still survives and is in use. Other notable buildings are the former town hall, now a community hall, and a small selection of farm buildings. If you have pictures of the church, or the statue in front of it, please post them below!

Esmonde Ontario

Farm Buildings in what is left of Esmonde